Shibori Scarf tutorial from episode 24
Shibori Scarf Felting for Scaredy Cats
By Betz White

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Materials
* old wool sweater
* washing machine
* sewing machine
* cotton string
* corks, bottle caps, coins, buttons (Several of one these items, or a mix of all will do.)

1) The first step is to select a sweater. There is a little bit of mystery in felting a pre-made wool garment. You never know how the wool has been treated in manufacturing. Besides trial and error, I have a not-too scientific process for this. This sweater is a fine gauge lambswool. It's a Men's size so it's nice and big! I hacked off a sleeve to test felt to be sure that I would get a good result before trying the shibori techniques. I just sent the sleeve through the washer (on hot) and dryer (on low) with some other laundry. Afterward, I compared the felted (actually "fulled") sleeve to the unwashed one. It shrunk about 4". Like I said, not very scientific, but my guess was that it would work for shibori.
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2) Next I cut the sweater into 4 rectangles and straight stitched on a sewing machine. Each rectangle measured about 9"x16".
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3)This is the time consuming part. Tie cotton string tightly around buttons, corks, super balls, soda bottle caps, whatever is interesting. I used a bunch of corks that were sliced into 1/4" thick "buttons". I tied off about 29 sections. The wool will shrink everywhere except where it is tied off. Be sure to use COTTON string because it has a high wet strength and it won't felt!
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4)Put the scarf in a lingerie bag. Felt in the washer by using hot water and a little detergent. Put some jeans in the load for some added friction. Stop when you get the desired result. Dry slightly in the dryer on low then air dry. Use a seam ripper to cut the string and remove objects after it is all the way dry. Be patient (it's hard!) it may need to sit overnight to dry completely.
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5) Ta da! Finished scarf. The total width shrunk about 1", the length shrunk about 12"! (from 64" to 52")

This tutorial was first published on Betz White's blog on May 6, 2006.